SITES FOR THE MONTH - May 2000

For this month I have selected a few sites that might interest you. For those who would like to get this and future articles e-mailed to you, please send an e-mail to vadivale@yahoo.com with the subject heading "Subscribe Cybermed Newsletter".

 

"When health is absent, wisdom cannot reveal itself,
art cannot become manifest,
strength cannot fight,
wealth becomes useless, and
intelligence cannot be applied."

~ Herophilus of Chalcedon, 335–280 BC, 
Physician to Alexander the Great ~

During the 20th century, the health and life expectancy of persons residing in the United States improved dramatically. In fact, people live approximately 30 years longer today than they did 100 years ago, and 25 of those years are attributable to advances in public health.  To highlight these advances, this Web site (above) profiles 10 great public health achievements. The information and charts are based on a series of reports published in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), ( http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/ ) April through December 1999. (http://www.cdc.gov/phtn/tenachievements/mmwr/mmwr.htm )(down) . Among the ten are Vaccinations, Safer workplaces, Safer and  healthier foods, Motor-vehicle safety, Infectious diseases, Heart disease and stroke , Family planning, Tobacco use, Mothers and babies, and Fluoridation of drinking  water.

 

The outbreak that started in Sarawak in April/June 1997 and spread to Peninsula and later to Taiwan in May/June 1998 is still very much in the news.

In the last publication of Berita MMA and in this, Dr.T.G.Yap had written at length the possible causative agent behind the outbreak in Sarawak. Not to long ago, the Centre of Disease Control Taiwan organised the APEC Enteroviral Watch Program for Children Symposium--EV71 Epidemic in Asia Pacific Area (26-27 March, 2000)(down). Many presentations were done including those by Prof. Lam Sai Kit and Prof. Jane Cardosa. Abstracts of the various presentation can be viewed at http://www.cdc.gov.tw/i/national.htm (down). The articles presented include

  1. NEUROLOGICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF CHILDREN WITH ENTEROVIRUS 71 INFECTION(down)

  2. VIRUS SURVEILLANCE IN SARAWAK, MALAYSIA: NEUROLOGICAL AND HAND, FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE (down)

  3. ACUTE NEUROLOGIC COMPLICATIONS IN CHILDREN WITH ENTEROVIRUS 71 INFECTION (down)
  4. FATAL ENCEPHALITIS SHOCK SYNDROME IN ASSOCIATION WITH ENTEROVIRUS 71 INFECTION: POSTULATED PATHOGENESIS BASED ON RISK ANALYSIS (down)
  5. Experimental enterovirus-71 infection in mice and its application in vaccine development (down)
  6. EVIDENCE OF ENTEROVIRUS 71 ENCEPHALITIS IN PENINSULAR MALAYSIA (down)
  7. Seroepidemiological study of enterovirus 71 before and after the 1998 epidemic in Chinese Taipei (down)
  8. Risk Factors of EV71-related Neurologic Involvement and Pulmonary Edema (down)
  9. Enterovirus type 71: Past and Present
  10. AN OUTBREAK OF ENTEROVIRUS 71 IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA WITH NEUROLOGICAL COMPLICATIONS IN YOUNG CHILDREN (down)
  11. DEVELOPMENT OF VACCINES AGAINST ENTEROVIRUS 71 (down)
  12. CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF FATAL AND NEAR-FATAL DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH AN ENTEROVIRUS OUTBREAK IN CHINESE TAIPEI, 1998 (down)
  13. PATHOLOGIC STUDIES OF ENTEROVIRUS 71 EPIDEMICS (down)
  14. MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY OF ENTEROVIRUS 71 IN EAST ASIA (down)
  15. SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF A CHILD WITH FULMINANT PULMONARY EDEMA AND BRAINSTEM ENCEPHALITIS OF ENTEROVIRUS 71 WITH EXTRACORPOREAL MEMBARANE OXYGENATION AND A PROPOSAL OF THE TERM "ENTEROVIRUS BRAINSTEM PULMONARY SYNDROME"
  16. PRINCIPLES AND POLICIES
  17. MOLECULAR VIROLOGY STUDY OF ENTEROVIRUS 71 ISOLATED IN AN EPIDEMIC IN CHINESE TAIPEI, 1998
  18. PATHOLOGY OF FATAL ENCEPHALOMYELITIS DURING AN OUTBREAK OF ENTEROVIRUS 71 INFECTION IN CHINESE TAIPEI

 

Recently published in the Science magazine and Journal of Infectious disease were three articles. The abstract is provided below.

  • The Science magazine - Science May 26 2000 ( http://www.sciencemag.org/ )
  • K. B. Chua, W. J. Bellini, P. A. Rota, B. H. Harcourt, A. Tamin, S. K. Lam, T. G. Ksiazek, P. E. Rollin, S. R. Zaki, W.-J. Shieh, C. S. Goldsmith, D. J. Gubler, J. T. Roehrig, B. Eaton, A. R. Gould, J. Olson, H. Field, P. Daniels, A. E. Ling, C. J. Peters, L. J. Anderson, and B. W. J. Mahy Science May 26 2000: 1432-1435.

  • Journal of Infectious Diseases:Electronic Edition
    • Volume 181, number 5 (May 2000) (http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JID/journal/contents/v181n5.html)
      • Case-Control Study of Risk Factors for Human Infection with a New Zoonotic Paramyxovirus, Nipah Virus, during a 1998-1999 Outbreak of Severe Encephalitis in Malaysia Umesh D. Parashar,1 Lye Munn Sunn,2 Flora Ong,6 Anthony W. Mounts,1 Mohamad Taha Arif,3 Thomas G. Ksiazek,1 Muhammad A. Kamaluddin,2 Amal N. Mustafa,2 Hanjeet Kaur,2 Lay Ming Ding,4 Ghazali Othman,7 Hayati M. Radzi,6 Paul T. Kitsutani,1 Patrick C. Stockton,1 John Arokiasamy,5 Howard E. Gary, Jr.,1 and Larry J. Anderson1 for the Nipah Encephalitis Outbreak Investigation Team Abstract       Full Text       PDF (57kb)       PostScript

      "An outbreak of encephalitis affecting 265 patients (105 fatally) occurred during 1998-1999 in Malaysia and was linked to a new paramyxovirus, Nipah, that infected pigs, humans, dogs, and cats. Most patients were pig farmers. Clinically undetected Nipah infection was noted in 10 (6%) of 166 community-farm controls (persons from farms without reported encephalitis patients) and 20 (11%) of 178 case-farm controls (persons from farms with encephalitis patients). Case patients (persons with Nipah infection) were more likely than community-farm controls to report increased numbers of sick/dying pigs on the farm (59% vs. 24%, P = .001) and were more likely than case-farm controls to perform activities requiring direct contact with pigs (86% vs. 50%, P = .005). Only 8% of case patients reported no contact with pigs. The outbreak stopped after pigs in the affected areas were slaughtered and buried. Direct, close contact with pigs was the primary source of human Nipah infection, but other sources, such as infected dogs and cats, cannot be excluded. "

      1Division of Viral and Rickettsial Diseases, National Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; 2Institute for Medical Research, 3Disease Control Division, Ministry of Health, 4Public Health Institute, and 5University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, 6Sarawak Health Department, Sarawak, and 7Negeri Sembilan State Health Department, Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia

      • Risk Factors for Nipah Virus Infection among Abattoir Workers in Singapore Madeleine H. L. Chew, Paul M. Arguin, David K. Shay, Kee-Tai Goh, Pierre E. Rollin, Wun-Ju Shieh, Sherif R. Zaki, Paul A. Rota, Ai-Ee Ling, Thomas G. Ksiazek, Suok-Kai Chew, and Larry J. Anderson Abstract       Full Text       PDF (56kb)       PostScript

      "During 10-19 March 1999, 11 workers in 1 of 2 Singaporean abattoirs developed Nipah-virus associated encephalitis or pneumonia, resulting in 1 fatality. A case-control study was conducted to determine occupational risk factors for infection. Case patients were abattoir A workers who had anti-Nipah IgM antibodies; control subjects were randomly selected abattoir A workers who tested negative for anti-Nipah IgM. All 13 case patients versus 26 (63%) of 41 control subjects reported contact with live pigs (P = .01). Swine importation from Malaysian states concurrently experiencing a Nipah virus outbreak was banned on 3 March 1999; on 19 March 1999, importation of Malaysian pigs was banned, and abattoirs were closed. No unusual illnesses among pigs processed during February-March were reported. Contact with live pigs appeared to be the most important risk factor for human Nipah virus infection. Direct contact with live, potentially infected pigs should be minimized to prevent transmission of this potentially fatal zoonosis to humans. "

  • My congratulations to the Malaysian Researcher's in having their publications accepted in the above journals, especially in a top level journal such as Science!

    The sky appears to be hazy again with the current rather hot spell. The sites I view for a general overview includes the following :

    Unfortunately, our Malaysian DOE site no longer gives the API index but the Malaysian Meterological Service carries the visibility index.

  • Department of Environment, Malaysia.
  • Malaysian Meteorological Service
  •  

    Guess you know why I am including some links on this topic. Patient right's to confidentiality is something our press has to know and not just place in print, what can "sell".

    A series of links on HIV and AIDs which was published in November 1997 Berita MMA issue.

    The theme for the 13th annual World AIDS Day (2000) has not been finalized yet but it has been decided that the focus will be men

    Information and resources from CDC on education and prevention, research findings, statistics and publications about AIDS-related trends.

    Gopher menus link to collections of abstracts, full-text articles and newsletters and to other Internet AIDS resources.

    UNAIDS is a joint venture among six UN organizations. Links categorized as Information Products (press releases, fact sheets), Epidemiology (global, country profiles), HIV/AIDS Issues (Women and Aids, STD's) and Conferences and Events.

     

    A list of related information on the above. Most information came from HIV POSITIVE.COM (http://www.hivpositive.com/index.html )

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    Locations of visitors to this page


    With that I let your "mouse" or your "keyboard" do the "talking".

    Till next month, "Happy Surfing".

    Cyberdoc (vadivale@yahoo.com )


    The links to URL mentioned above are valid at the time of writing (30 May 2000). Last Updated 25th June 2005.

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